Viking Girl

Discussion started by littlebirdy

Hi guys, I present to you a new character - Viking Girl https://www.cgtrader.com/3d-models/character/woman/viking-girl-b331123f-56b2-412e-b34a-041cd6f5c3fc

It is interesting and important for me to hear your opinion.

Thank you for your interest.

Answers

Posted about 1 month ago
0

Do you have a native software version? Not sure what you used to create this model, but it's typically very helpful to sales if you offer at least one native file type. For example, if you did this model in Maya, include the .ma file for clients to use. This way you can include the custom rig with it, which would be much better than just the FBX version. Same thing if it was done in Blender or 3dsmax or C4D. The native rigging and materials would be a much more tempting sales option for those people who utilize those software packages for animation.

littlebirdy wrote
littlebirdy
Unfortunately, my slow Internet does not allow uploading several gigabytes of Zbrush sources, but thanks for the advice, I'll try to do something about it.
luxxeon wrote
luxxeon
A ZTL file should never be in the GB file size. No one really sells Zbrush scene files. One quick observation: the character mesh is still triangulated in your wireframes, but the clothing is proper quad topology. Not sure if that was intentional. Good luck.
Posted about 1 month ago
1

Out of curiosity, is this a daz3d model?

littlebirdy wrote
littlebirdy
No, it was created using zbrush and 3dcoat. Daz3d seemed to me difficult to use. However, the comparison with daz is quite flattering, there are many beautiful models in it, thanks.
Posted about 1 month ago
0

Yes they have excellent models, I think yours is just as good if not better. The reason I ask is making a model and export in daz can take 2 hours with all the textures. I imagine doing this in zbrush and 3d coat would take a massive amount of time, which begs the question why are you selling it so cheap? I would say the market price for this quality is around $100-$200 and very much worth it.

littlebirdy wrote
littlebirdy
Yes you are right. I set the price based on the statistics of the trading platform itself. As I understand, expensive models are not very fond of buying, and cheap ones can be bought more often, which in total will give a large profit. But I'm still new to this, so I could be wrong.
Posted about 1 month ago
1

Well you can do what you like - I'm wont give you a lecture so take the information with a grain of salt.

A couple of things to think about:
- Check where you are getting these statistics. When you search 'female' and set 'sort by highest price' look at the quality of the models, many of these are about $250 and then go down from here and your quality is higher than this.
- Check multiple platforms for average prices, just because you sell here doesn't mean that's the value of the product - consider your options (some range up to $600 and that is worth it for a high quality rigged female model).
- Professionals in the industry are not worried about high prices (within reason). They are looking for quality content and happy to pay the price for it as long as its not crazy. ($150-$200 would be a bargain price for this item)
- Generally higher prices indicate higher quality. Prices that are well below the standard are usually warning signs: something has been rushed, its not what it seems, it could be stolen - things professionals will consider before purchasing as they don't want to be painted into a copyright corner.
- What value does it bring the customer, so if I value my time at $30 an hour and that model takes me 40 hours the model has a value of $1200, buying it for $150 just saved me $1050 of my time. Lots of people don't have the skills for this type of work so if its in demand it has a high value. It could also take someone else 3x longer to make this model so the value is scaled from this point of view.
- Profit: Think in a business sense, if you sold 15x $25 model that's $375, if you sold a $150 model 5x then that's $750 (minus commission). 5x Great reviews is gold in comparison to 15 customers who say nothing.
- Over time as quality content increases globally at this point is a good time to lower your prices as your content may not be in as much demand.
- Like a mosquito biting you in the night, small things have accumulative consequences. By offering high quality content at low prices you affect the entire market by bringing down the cost of all items in that category - you are in the race to the bottom. The flip side is by offering value to your customers you can join the race to the top. For example: its PBR, its real-time ready, it can be used in multiple render engines etc, these items add value to your content and give you a wider audience thus demand a higher price.

Again this is all things to think about, you can keep your prices the same and test our your strategy any way you like, I'm not biased either way. I'm also in the race to the top so what you do has little effect on my marketing strategy which is to provide value to customers. You can buy the shoe from the brand store or you can buy it from the knock-off shop, you get what you pay for and you earn what you are worth.

Posted about 1 month ago
1

Just as a side note for some perspective, I was working on a tv commercial for some Marvel thing a few years ago, I needed a rigged Hulk for a short 2 second shot. I found one on the market place, it cost me $600. The rig was broken, the skinning was bad, the textures weren't that great. Saved me a week modelling of my time as characters is not my expertise. Took 1 day to re-rig and skin and clean up the textures, best $600 I spent - the artist just didn't get a 5 star review for these mishaps. Client pays $xx,xxx for the commercial and everyone is happy - its all perspective.

Also in the industry we get budgets for these things, so spending $2,000 on models for a commercial is quite reasonable - depending on a few factors. Client budget, Industry, intended use etc... Things you should seriously consider before building models in the first place. For example archviz models are in the mid price range because lots of studios don't have the budget to spend over $500 for each project, maybe its every 3rd project. So all these are factors that will affect your prices. I would also consider selling the character clothing you have on platforms that make use of it, I have one friend who makes just clothing for Second Life and has made a full time living from that for the last 3 years. You have lots of options when it comes to characters, I would suggest experimenting where you can.

littlebirdy wrote
littlebirdy
Thanks for the detailed answer, I will take it into account and watch the sales figures. I will also look at information about other trading platforms about which I do not know yet. It's amazing that you were the only one who responded and described the situation in such detail. I appreciate it.
Posted about 1 month ago
0

No probs, all the best. Also @luxxeon had some good points as well :)

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