Creating finished products that work in the real world instead of 3D regular models

Discussion started by miaomiao3d

Creating finished products that work in the real world instead of 3D regular models is far more gratifying and stimulating.

Here is my Helipad created in 3D first but now as you can see is a finished product that actually works!

Part Puzzle and adjustable in height, it makes a great toy for those who really want to improve their flying skills.

After all... everyone can fly a heli but landing... well

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ug1HHGPwPAI&featur...

Answers

Posted about 5 years ago
0

Well it's an assumption that may work for you, but not for everybody : it really depends on what you're after.
Most of the models I create, I do not create for selling but for my own animation purposes, and once I have finished with them, I put them on selling places because I don't exactly know what to do with them.
My main motivation here is to create animations I could not create otherwise (sci-fi or medieval). Thus, I have very little to no interest in printable models or creating something that would work in the real world, as I expect to forget the real world when modeling, animating or rendering...

You can get some examples of my animation hobby here :
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7TfSsyntec3ZAgeRKZXeJg

So clearly a question of goal and focus depending on each individual.

Posted about 5 years ago
0

Very cool animations and as I said before I am a big fan of your work but are you saying that if CGtrader was to 3D print one of your models because you won a competition and send it to you, on top of the regular prize you get, (so you could keep it as part of your collection at home) that, that would not be something you would be against?

Posted about 5 years ago
0

It would suppose that my models are printable, which they are not. Modeling for 3D-printing is a different technique than regular or game-ready objects. My sci-fi models, for the most complicated ones (the ones with hundreds of greebles and nurnies) would require an awful amount of time to become printable, just because of non manifold edges or intersecting geometry - it's not just a matter of scaling. UV-mapping or texturing are also a different mater between regular and printable models. A detailed castle, for instance, could not use a mid-poly geometry with displacement, you would have to have all the details. Painting a very high poly model would quickly become a problem. So I prefer to model what I want or need to render correctly, without caring about their possibility to become real 3D-prints.
I am working of the printable conversion of one of my historical models for a cultural association in my country. And in one word, it's a nightmare, even if "cheating" by voxelizing the whole model in 3D-coat an export a decimated manifold one to Lightwave before scaling and final .stl export.

Posted about 5 years ago
0

Ah yes... You are right creating 3D printable models is more complex hence why it would seem it is a more profitable en devour especially since it isn't something that everyone knows how to do... yet

Having said that since you are creating a 3D printable version of your model...once you have it printed I am sure you will feel the same sense of accomplishment I did after turning my model into reality :)

Posted about 5 years ago
0

I beg to disagree : creating printable models is not more complex than regular ones. It is only different. Different logic, different method and workflow for a different end usage ; especially as you have to care about geometry more than in regular models to some extent (non manifold edges, non intersecting geometry), but you often don't bother with UVs and texturing, for instance, which is a big part of the regular model creation workflow.
Once again, not a question of complexity or satisfaction in absolute value, but a question of what you're after.
There are a lot of models on this site which are print-ready, and are basically only scans of real objects. Awful topology, impossible to use in production, but print ready, and generated automatically by specialized softwares : not quite complex, in my humble opinion.

Posted about 5 years ago
1

As a side note, I do know how to create printable models, and I have already printed two of my space fighters.
Once it's done, they look like a dead piece of plastic to me, whereas in my animations, they are living and fighting against their ennemies.
So, as far as I'm concerned, I prefer them moving on a screen than sleeping on a shelf.

Posted about 5 years ago
0

Actually the main difference between an amateur 3D modeler and a professional is their ability to create good geometry that flows and that won't cause problems during 3D printing or animation. Even a kid using freeware can build a complex 3D model these days but only a handful of modelers can model something like a human body muscle structure in such a way that it will deform properly.

As far as your models go even a lifeless piece of plastic can be turned into a living masterpiece. I could turn a 3D printed version of one of your boats into an RC vehicle, with LEDs and all. Whether I could get it to fly... that would depend on how heavy the plastic print is and how much money one is willing to put into it.

Anything is possible with 3D printing combined with electronics.

Posted about 5 years ago
1

I guess we to agree to disagree.
What I meant to say when I reacted to your first post, was : don't take for granted that if creating actual objects from 3D, even combined with electronics, is more gratifying for you, it would be for everybody, because it's simply not the case.

What's fantastic for you may not be as thrilling for other people, such as me. I don't care of having any of my models stuffed with leds and electronics, even to become radio-controlled, because that would not allow me to create Sci-fi or fantasy animation, which is what I thrive for.
You say "anythnig is possible with 3D-printing combined with electronics", and I say it wouldn't give any benefit for what I want with my models.
Because I want my models to be part of animations with a lot of explosions and lens flares and VFX, and I create them for that very specific purpose and that is way more gratifying for me than having them transformed as another model kit, because I just want to tell stories.

As I said in my initial reply : it really depends on what you're after.
As a concluding thought, here is my personal walk through 3D and animation. It may explain better why I don't care about creating actual things :
http://captainmarlowe.blogspot.fr/2015/02/some-personal-thoughts-about-3d-vfx-and.html

Posted about 5 years ago
0

Thanks for the link to your blog! It was a great read :)

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