Hello, reason I came and little bit about myself

Discussion started by dmbgamer7

Hello, forum users,

Seems, I have to get involved in order to download more free models. I was under the misconception that the free and royalty free models were there to allow a user to start generating cash flow so that they will be able to purchase better models. Right now. I am out of work been like that since May 2020 when I quit my physically demanding job that I was unable to meet the "time" demands of the company. I figured why kill myself since I have a BS in Mathematics with a Minor in Computer Science (focus Java Programming). During this time off work, I started working on creating a few mods for RUST (Steam Game) after discovering that I can understand C sharp and the game's API. This introduced me to Unity's API. After having a conversation with another RUST Player about game development, I came to the realization that my dream of being a published writer can be realized through gaming medium instead of the written word. I been a graphical artist since I can remember. I remember sitting at my grandfather's 386 machine that he finally got Windows 3.1 to work drawing landscape (basic perspective, I was like 7) using the old MSPaint. I was using old LOGO program, which required typing commands to move a turtle to draw, for the Commodore64 at home. Then, I moved onto bigger and better programs as a hobby. For the past few years as graphic programs and games improved, I have been left in the dust. Now, that I have decided to create my first game to generate revenue for a better game based on a world I have been creating since I was 9. I was told to come here to get free models to start creating the game instead of taking days, weeks or months to create all the models needed.

For those that have created models for the free and royalty free downloads, I just want to say thank you. I know that isn't enough. As a new and just starting out game developer without any formal education or schooling, those models are great. I have spent countless hours already trying to create my first female model in Blender. First, started with Sculpting...then building a low poly model through merging cylinders together from toes to fingers. I watch youtube videos to learn about rigging and animation. Anyway, I will be here. This is a very useful resource for a struggling game developer. Until next time, Peace.

Now, how am I suppose to get 100 points, again. That's right upload 5 low poly models...that shouldn't be to hard...just time.

DMBgamer7

Answers

Posted 3 months ago
5

@stereomanik

sorry, but i have to disagree with that.
i might not be the best 3d modeler out there, but i doubt i am the worst and 3d modeling is just a side job that i hardly put any time in.
for my actual job, the job of a landscape architect, i needed to master Autocad and Photoshop, and considering my boss has not fired me yet, i suppose i am doing pretty well. i also work with other graphic programs like illustrator, in design, gis, blender, etc

and i can tell you, i can't draw, and i can not do it even if my life depended on in.
Not for my lack of trying mind you. But especially for a landscape architect, my drawing skills are horrible. You don't need to be able to draw with a pencil to use graphic computer programs, all you need is to understand reality and how things like perspective, shading and scale work.
Leaning to draw can help with all of those things, but it is not the only way to do it, learning to make photographs like a professional also teaches you a lot of the basics. And i personally find that observing and studying reality and the stuf you wan't to 3d model a lot more useful that learning to draw.

so if you like drawing, do it!!
it might help a lot in developing your computer skills. But saying you can't go beyond the basics of 3d modeling if you can't draw is just nonsens.

stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
I believe you, I have taught some architects to draw. A program knows what people don't know, so a person who can't draw can draw a picture. And everything is fine as long as you don't complicate your life too much, but I would like to see what a person who only uses primitives to create architectural elements or furniture does if they are asked to model an elephant.
Posted 3 months ago
4

In 3d modeling understanding of the shape of the object that you want to replicate is the key, it doesn't matter if you have ability to draw or not. To understand shape, you need to do research of that particular object (assuming that 3d software and how topology work is mastered). As Pablo Picasso once said "My paintings are 80% research, 20% painting/drawing".

stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
Understand the shape is exactly what a draftsman does
PhantomDesign wrote
Understanding shape is one thing, transfering that on the piece of paper is another. It's like apples and oranges. 3d modeling is like a puzzle made from triangles or some other geometry figure that is assembled by following the shape that you "learn" trough research. Do you need ability to draw to be able to assemble jigsaw puzzle ?
stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
Modeling is not like a puzzle in any way, modeling is create a shape in three dimensions, and yes you need to know how to draw to do it.
Posted 3 months ago
3

Gonna help you get those 100 points and add my comment to the conversation.

For the record, I cant draw.

Don’t ask me to draw on paper the things I model/sculpt in 3D, its not gonna happen.
I am relatively good at making up my mind about what I want to design but I cannot translate those visions to a 2D paper using a pencil, that's just going to result in a big mess.

I use the tools that work best for me getting the ideas out but for me that's not paper and pencil.

Anyways, I believe you can basically become a good whatever, starting from scratch.
Meaning, there is no preconditions required (except your time and effort) to get to work and develop your potentials (whatever they are).

That said, it probably helps if you are already good at something (like for example drawing).
On other hand, all those years I used 3D modeling and sculpting apps it kind of improved my drawing skills somewhat.

My impression is acquired skills improve abilities in different directions.

stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
Of course, that´s why people learn how to draw
SimonTGriffiths wrote
SimonTGriffiths
Sort of on topic, my mother used to oil paint using seagull feathers. If you ever get a chance to try that...don't lol
luxxeon wrote
luxxeon
That's a good point, iterateCGI. @SimonTGriffiths - I don't think I'll ever get the chance. I wouldn't know how to acquire a seagull feather anyway. LOL
Posted 3 months ago
2

I can't draw

stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
Maybe not a lot, but if you have done the skull model, you know how to draw, maybe you don´t want.
Posted 3 months ago
1

Just be careful when you buy some of those very cheap (for the quality) models, because they may be stolen - ripped from other games.
I recently read a post by a game developer who got his game taken down from Google Play Store, because he had used such copyrighted models in his game.
Those are hard to detect, but if you suspect such thing, what you can do is to show the model to some other gamedevs or hardcore gamers and ask if they recognize the model.

trimitek wrote
trimitek
Oh.. and if you do detect such model - report it to support@cgtrader.com - they are trying hard to clean up the market from thieves.
Posted 3 months ago
1

When I first got into selling 3d models, I had at least a dozen or so that I offered for free just to get my name out there or get eyeballs on my work. This was probably 8 or so years ago now. However, I quickly realized this was not working out as people were downloading my free models and then reselling them as their own for a profit. So most of the models I originally offered for free, I changed to be paid models. I kept a few of them free but most now are paid, which did seem to curb that abuse.

At any rate, welcome to CGT. Hopefully, you find what you need for your game here. I would recommend learning some basic modeling in something like Blender too though. In just a few months you could have the skills necessary to at least model certain items for yourself, which would save you money in the long run. You might think you don't have the time for that, but trust me, you will eventually find that time you spend searching for free models that may or may not be exactly what you need will take up a lot of your time as well. That could have been time spent learning the basics of some 3d package.

I agree that knowing how to draw is very helpful to 3d modeling, but I don't feel that it is essential. I know of several very good modelers who couldn't draw much more than a stick figure on paper, but they could model hard surface objects with incredible skill and efficiency. Of course, organic modeling (sculpting) is another story. It really helps to have that real-world artistic eye to be able to freehand sculpt an organic shape. The best 3d sculptors using sculpting software (Zbrush, 3dCoat, Blender) all seem to have a foundation and background in traditional media art. Again, it depends on the type of modeling you wish to learn, and how far you wish to progress. In your case, you could learn basic box modeling and make your own props in relatively short period of time, if you dedicate a few months to learning a specific package that is geared for that purpose.

Posted 3 months ago
1

I think its only fair @stereomanik that we refer to the two paradigms 'drawing' and 'CAD' (computer aided drawing) for clarity - thus eliminating the potential for a straw man argument. Therefore its not shocking to you or anyone else potentially being confused by this thread.

Carry on.

LemonadeCG wrote
LemonadeCG
Actually CAD stands for Computer-Aided Design, not drawing. Just saying.
3DCargo wrote
3DCargo
indeed @LemonadeCG you are correct. It can Also be Computer Aided Drafting... a new suggestion, lets not use acronyms :D
stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
In italian language, disegno, refers to drawing,in french, dessin translates as drawing, in spanish there is a difference between diseño (design), and dibujo (drawing), more or less like in english language, but both concepts refer to a kind of drawing
Posted 3 months ago
1

Welcome to CGT mate. Good luck with your project.

@stereomanik My mother was a professional artist for 50 years, didn't know which way up a mouse went haha! I believe it's about wanting to learn, 3D modelling isn't a gift, being an artist is.

stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
I agree, of course, it´s a pity true artists are so few, but the rest of us must live anyway
Posted 3 months ago
0

Welcome, hope you find suitable material for your projects.
As a modeler, I had for some time a few free models, the idea was to try to introduce the prospective buyer to paid models.
With that said, I would like to make a side note, all the technology involved in producing 3D models and movies hides one basic fact.
For one can create impressive mountains of moving water, or gigantic explosions the size of a galaxy, simply by learning to use a certain program.
We assume that, within the 3d universe, where there is the possibility of developing hundreds of different professional activities, everything consists of that, in learning to master a program.
And this hides the basic fact that a 3D model is just a drawing, nothing more and nothing less, because it is impossible to model anything that is not primitive if you don't know how to draw.
If you don't know how to draw, it is impossible to learn to master a modeling program, you can take advantage of the simple and default modes that the program offers, and there are many people who do and sincerely believe that they can model.

Posted 3 months ago
0

To further my background, I had Autodesk 2010 3D Studio Max working on my machine until I had to wipe my machine after having issues. I upgraded to Windows 10 and learned at that point that I was unable to authorize the old software since Autodesk has discontinued support. I also had Adobe CS3 Master Collection, which the CDs are now just a paperweight for the same reason. Those two software packages can still do a lot, but money wins and I am left with unusable software. Since learning my lesson, I am sticking to open source community projects, which if I can start generating revenue, I will support. I started in 3D modeling world using Ulead Cool 3D then Ulead Cool 3D Production Studio, an inexpensive software that did the job. I have 105 Ulead *.c3d files with models that one day I will figure out a way to open and retrieve them.

I have uploaded two models today: a pair of glasses/lens (https://www.cgtrader.com/free-3d-models/character/clothing/wearable-lens-simple) and an executive desk (https://www.cgtrader.com/free-3d-models/furniture/other/metal-executive-desk). My plan is to start working one room in my game to try to get most of the scripting done; thus, I just need enough game objects/ models to get that done. Thanks for all who have posted.

LemonadeCG wrote
LemonadeCG
AFAIK, Adobe publicly released activation codes for CS3 suite, so everyone who owns it, can still legally use the software, despite licensing servers being shut down. It shouldn't be hard to google it.
Posted 3 months ago
0

My 2 cents on the drawing issue. I dont think its drawing specifically that helps, but things liike composition, proportions, .. things like that. (That is part of drawing, but not only drawing) And tthesee are things thaat you dont learn just by learning how to use a program. Here flipped normals discuss similar things: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7SHNll8Pl7k

stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
It is a curious point of view, what you describe is exactly what a draftsman does, the drawing is not the lines drawn by the hand, if the hand can draw lines, it is because the eye measures, compares, highlights, isolates. It is the eye that draws, before being able to draw a line, the eye must have seen it, it has to compare what it means with the meaning of other lines, real or possible, it has to consider its role in the drawing as a whole, it has to understand what indicates according to the phase of the drawing, is a very complex process of understanding, whose visible result is a significant line. And that is why the practice of drawing teaches us to observe the world in a different way, since, in reality, we only know what we see, and we only really see what we draw.
Mantas-Talmantas wrote
Mantas-Talmantas
@stereomanik - yes, all what you describe helps a lot on 3d. all this "understanding / observing / thinking / analyzing" that comes before you even put a pen on paper is important. And yes, when you draw (usually) you are working on these described "skills". I guess what i wanted to say - its not only / not necessarily only drawing that helps with this.
Posted 3 months ago
0

It is still shocking that someone believes that a drawing program does not require knowing how to draw.
Actually, more or less passable results can be achieved by working only with the most basic elements that require less knowledge, but that is because that knowledge is in the program and someone who knew has put it there.
I think the confusion comes from what each one understands drawing is, according to the opinions seen in the thread.
Drawing is representing a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional surface, and this requires knowledge of perspective, proportion, anatomy, etc.
Since the final result obtained from a 3D program is the representation of a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional plane, it follows that it is a drawing program, in which case it would be desirable to know how to draw.

ultra-in-order wrote
ultra-in-order
it's shocking man that you assumed something like this without any actual research or sources, off course having the ability to draw is good, but it's absolutely unnecessary for you to model a 3d object, you said Drafts man a lot, and claimed that a person that can't draw; can't model a 3d elephant. since you are practically using hand drawings as a tool to imitate a real life animal, a 3d modeling program does the same thing, when you model an elephant by your definition you are a drafts man, you are not inventing anything, you're literally copying from nature. Wild Claims require Strong Facts friend!
stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
This is exactly what I say, if you are able to model an elephant you are a draftsman even if never took a pencil, you´re using the same skills but with another tool. So you agree that a 3D program is a drawing tool.
stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
The representation of objects in 3 dimensions was not born with modeling programs, it was born with drawing. During the twenties, thirties and forties it was normal to find three-dimensional representations of consumer objects in the advertising of magazines, due to the printing techniques there was a specific drawing technique, the "English pen" with which hyper-realistic results were obtained with objects like watches, fountain pens and things like that. During the fifties, with the rise of color printing, it was normal to find totally photorealistic car advertisements made by hand, much better and more attractive than a simple photo of that time, paradoxically an illustration was much more realistic than a photo. Before 3D programs appeared, detailed and three-dimensional architectural presentations were also made, only there were few and well paid people who did that work. Statistics are not needed to see that all beginners and many professionals in the modeling field are dedicated to architecture and furniture for the simple reason that they do not know how to draw an organic object, nor would they know how to raise a perspective on the plans of a house.
Posted 3 months ago
0

There is a difference when drawing 2D with a pencil and paper than "drawing" in the 3D world of a CAD 3D program. In 2D Drawing (Illustrating) is the act of drawing specific lines segments and curves to the trick the eye of the viewer into thinking they are looking at an inanimate or animate object in reality. Of course that depends entirely on the drawing technique employed. Whereas 3D Drawing/ Modeling is the act of actually creating the inanimate or animate object in the digital reality. In the 3D world, the artist isn't actually trying to trick the viewer, but rather preset the actual representation to the viewer. However, the artist chooses to bring the model/ drawing into the 3D Digital World is entirely up to them. However, I do agree with knowing the fundamentals of 2D Drawing (Tricking the eye and how is it is done) will aid the 3D Artist in producing a model faster than those that don't. This is similar to a seeing person verse a non-seeing (blind) person. The seeing person can navigate the world by relying on vision, but the blind person isn't restricted to not moving, are they? No, the blind person will move about the space using other techniques...sometimes stumbling around. I believe that is the argument. A person who knows how to draw will be able to produce a model where as the person that doesn't will just have to rely on other techniques...some of which will have them stumbling around until they get what they are after.

stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
I understand what you are saying and I agree with the blind man analogy. However, the process in the digital world in which you shape a three-dimensional object is no different from the process of shaping anything in the real world. And to build something in the real world, you still need the drawing. I see it like this: An idea is something intangible, and, through drawing, it ends up materializing in the physical world, in this there is no difference with the virtual world. Everything that man builds begins with a drawing, I am not going to discuss the quality of that drawing, but you can look at Leonardo's machine drawings, what makes them convincing is the use of perspective, shading, etc. in a 3d program, the perspective is automatic, the shading, too, but that it is automatic does not mean that it does not exist, it means that someone has coded the necessary data and functions so that the user does not have to do it by hand and can apply it with more ease. But if that means that the person knows nothing of perspective and only leans on the program, it is only a matter of time that he is in trouble, he is the blind man.
Posted 3 months ago
0

I would like to leave a final comment on the subject of the drawing.
Perhaps not everyone is aware that a drawing is constructed.
Although the final result is only lines, these lines make a series of shapes visible in space, the eye, hand and mind of the artist deal with these shapes, perceive the space and try to represent it.
I mean that all that "virtual world" of 3D drawing is nothing more than a miniature copy of the mental world in which the practice of traditional drawing unfolds.
For that reason it does not present any difficulty for those who know how to draw, and it becomes hell for those who do not know.

luxxeon wrote
luxxeon
I think 2d drawing and 3d modeling are only the same in theory because they follow the same mathematical principles of geometry and require a certain knowledge of perspective and shape. However, traditional 3d modeling is much more to do with the understanding of space and geometric relationships than it is to do with artistic skill. 2D drawing can be like that too, but some people who are great at drawing organic forms are not so good a drafting and vice versa. Therefor the same holds true for people who may be adept at drawing with pen an paper compared to building shapes in 3d space. A perfect example is my girlfriend who graduated art school and can draw incredibly well but simply can not grasp 3d modeling or sculpting. It's a different kind of skill. That said, I agree that the best 3d artists are those who have a background in both disciplines. An understanding of shape and form in both mediums. Yes, these are usually the CG artists who make the most impact and do the most interesting work. However, it's certainly not a requirement. Comparing 3d modeling to traditional drawing is like comparing 3d animation to 2d animation. Most of the 3d animators I know have no background in 2D animation. They just understand movement and study it in the same way that 2d animators have. Good thread though. I like this type of conversation. Quite interesting.
stereomanik wrote
stereomanik
There is a point that is not clear, to draw is to represent a three-dimensional object on a flat surface, this may or may not be related to art. It is not strange to find artists who do not understand three-dimensional space, I have met some, but since their interest is usually color, they do not care, however, those who do, are always better artists. The essential thing about drawing is spatial understanding, no matter what tool you use, a pencil or a modeling program, everything in the program are tools that a good draftsman knows how to use, because they are the same tools that he has been using to draw. The result of a well-constructed drawing is a correctly constructed spatial form. Here I am not talking about art in the usual sense, but about the process of understanding and representing a form in three dimensions. Given an adequate level of finish, you couldn't tell if a model was hand-drawn or 3D modeled.

Your answer

In order to post an answer, you need to sign in.

Help