Looking for Feedback and Suggestions

Discussion started by Empire-Assets

Hey Howdy!

I've been uploading some new models to my page and overall I've started to take this whole "selling 3D models" thing a bit more seriously. I'd really appreciate it if some of you more experienced/higher-selling folks can give me some pointers on my page and models. I've tried to create a cohesive look for my products, but I don't know if it's helping me or hurting me. My oldest products are my Medieval weapons, and using what I learned from creating those, I've recently started uploading Egyptian and Roman weapons. I'd like someone else's perspective on those models. I've tried to express certain things more clearly and give more details to potential customers, but again, I have no idea if that's effective or detrimental. Does anything stand out about my models or are they just absolute crap? Any feedback or suggestions or general comments you might have would help me out greatly. Thanks in advance, Yours Truly, Empire-Assets.

Answers

Posted 10 months ago
0

Looks like a good job to me, only thing I notice is most of your models are high poly (not game ready), but the type of items you create probably have more demand in games?

Empire-Assets wrote
Empire-Assets
When I started uploading, I figured I'd have the most appeal with game-people but I've had a couple customers who are miniature model makers. I've tried to make it clear that each model has High Poly and Low Poly variants, but not all of my models are labeled with the Low-Poly tag, partially because in my photos I'm presenting the High-Poly version. I'm also not entirely sure what constitutes as "Game Ready." Even though I have low-poly models, they're not rigged or fully PBR.
Posted 10 months ago
0

Must agree with iterate, you do appear to make stuff that game-devs would be the most interested in, but you need to provide these game-ready to make them more attractive to buyers. I'll do my best to explain "game-ready" as it isn't written in stone anywhere. Hi-poly is more about showing off what you can do rather than providing a model that someone can simply import into their game engine and be ready to place it in the world they've created without it having a detrimental effect.

Game-devs expect models to be exported using quads, efficiency is more important than how pretty it looks. Atlas mapped models are most attractive because they only require a single draw call, split models with multiple textures are complicated and take a lot more CPU time, and therefore a burden on the game.

If you're making props, for instance, you don't want or need a high-poly, CPU eating model of a crate in the background that no one will ever interact with. If it's a character model then you can usually afford to be a little more elaborate. Supplying PBR models is always a good thing, game-devs can omit whatever maps they feel are too heavy but they would struggle to add new maps that aren't provided.

When I do game contracts I generally provide the base, normal, roughness, metalness and height maps as standard, sometimes, but rarely, I will be asked for the AO map.

In short, just make sure that your model is low-poly, PBR and as optimised as possible. You should provide the model in a commonly used format such as FBX or OBJ, and the end-user should be able to just import it and be ready to use it. This is game-ready.

If you're using something like Substance Painter then you can bake a hi-poly normal onto a low-poly mesh which will save a lot of subdivision to get smooth edges or base detail. Something to look into anyway.

Good luck with your model's mate and may you sell a million.

Empire-Assets wrote
Empire-Assets
Thanks for the info! I'll keep working on PBR and see if I can get my models set up properly.

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